Take Care Where You Sit

Defensiveness, self-pity, self-righteousness are often our response to avoid change. -Pastor Jeremy, Uptown Church Chicago

Psalm 1.1 How blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, Nor stand in the path of sinners, Nor sit in the seat of scoffers! NASB

…Nor sit [down to rest] in the seat of I.e. shallow thinkers who are quick to mock or disdain. scoffers (ridiculers). AMP

…or sit in the company of mockers. NIV

SCOFFERS,
Hebrew: to scorn, make mouths at, talk arrogantly, to boast, to scorn, to mock, deride

Verse 2? Here comes the “rather”, the sense of “instead”-

Instead he finds pleasure in obeying the Lord’s commands; he meditates on His commands day and night. ESV

ESV Notes:
“Instead…” Here the Hebrew expression כִּי־אִם (ki-’im, “instead”) introduces a contrast between the sinful behavior depicted in v. 1 and the godly lifestyle described in v. 2. “he finds pleasure in obeying the Lord’s commands;” Heb. “his delight [is] in the law of the Lord.” In light of the following line, which focuses on studying the Lord’s law, one might translate, “he finds pleasure in studying the Lord’s commands.” However, even if one translates the line this way, it is important to recognize that (Glenn’s italics for emphasis here) mere study and intellectual awareness are not ultimately what bring divine favor. Study of the law is metonymic here for the correct attitudes and behavior that should result from an awareness of and commitment to God’s moral will; thus “obeying” has been used in the [ESV] translation rather than “studying.” “he meditates on” -The Hebrew imperfect verbal form draws attention to the characteristic behavior described here and lends support to the hyperbolic adverbial phrase “day and night.” The verb הָגָה (hagag) means “to recite quietly; to meditate” and refers metonymically to intense study and reflection. “his commands” Or “his law.” “day and night.”

As always, thanks for stopping by. -Glenn

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